Fashion Burkas

Last week I went to see my friend, Saad Ahmed, do his thing at an open mic in town… it’s one of the things I like to do when I am not glued to my computer screen or locked away in my room sewing. I always like to support local artists (comedy is an artform), and Saad is probably my favorite local comedian (if you ever get a chance to see him, I recommend it).  This blog post is credited in part to him for unwittingly implanting the initial idea.

In the setup for one of his jokes, Saad brings up having seen a fashion show in the middle east with all the women wearing burkas. This got me wondering if there actually was such a thing… There IS! And contrary to the remark within Saad’s joke, it is nowhere near boring. 🙂

Whether you realize it or not, when you get up in the morning and get dressed for the day, the clothes that you wear speak to other people and the rest of society about who you are. Our clothes are a form of non-verbal communication. They communicate information such as our age, our gender (whichever we identify with), what kind of work we do (sometimes how much money we have or don’t have), what part of the country or the world we come from, and sometimes, as in the case of the burka, we communicate our religion as well.
The burka is perhaps one of the most expressive and talkative of all wardrobes. There is so much that is connected to the burka.. politics, religion, women’s issues, oppression/freedom, deep and rich histories.. who on this planet does not hold some manner of fascination for the burka?

What you can wear, what you can’t wear

At it’s root, the burka is meant to provide modesty for Muslim women. It is loose clothing that covers the body, the head and sometimes the face as well. While the Koran never specifies the need to wear a burka, it does cite the need for modesty, and for a lot of Muslim women around the world, there are indeed a wider range of options. A lot of the Muslim women I went to college with wore nice abayas and hijabs, some also wore their hijabs with jeans and a shirt. I also know women who don’t really even wear hijab most of the time. There are places where full burkas are enforced, such as places in Afghanistan, and places where burkas are forbidden, such as Syrian schools and there have been a lot of controversies concerning burkas in France. (I remember reading a story last year about a woman in a burkini getting kicked off a French beach.)

Burka as a Fashion Statement

Sri Lankan rapper M.I.A. donned this burka at an award show in October 2010.

This outfit, part of Iran’s 2008 fashion show, is actually quite pretty (in my opinion).

In the summer of 2008, Iran held a government approved fashion show (1) in which they tried to enliven the expression of women’s attire while still keeping with the law. While I’m not entirely sure what women in Iran would chose to wear if there were no strict dress code in place, and I doubt that Culture and Islamic Orientation Minister Saffar Harandi was really getting into the women’s psyche in his feelings that, as source 1 states,  “the show ‘freed’ Iranian women from the ‘shackles’ of the western fashion industry”, he does have a valid point for consideration. While western women (like myself) are supposedly free to wear what we want to, even we are pressured to conform to a social image and are confined either to what we have access to buy or are able to make for ourselves (if we know how). I know that I have often felt uncomfortable clothes shopping because mainstream women’s clothes in America are meant to hug your body, sit low (low-rider jeans, v-neck shirts), and more or less sexualize you. I wore men’s pants and baggy shirts for the longest time and still dread going swimming as I feel eternally self-conscious in even a one piece swimsuit. (Maybe I might opt for one of those burkinis myself, heh).

This is pretty much the “anti-burka” burka. I find the constroversial piece to be artistic and interesting. Photo from source 2. (Mattis Sanblad, Scanpix/AP Photo)

Probably as a rebellious comment upon the burka bans in France, I have come across a number of burkas and burka inspired pieces coming from French designers like Jean-Charles de Castelbajac and Marithé François Girbaud (3). Of course, while it could be argued that some of these designs are offensive in that they steal another’s cultural dress and distort it to suit their needs/desires (don’t act like it hasn’t been done before multiple times by almost everyone, it’s part of cultural diffusion. Look at Japanese Lolita outfits sometime.), I think that these designs are coming as a reaction to the ban (or proposed ban.. haven’t been able to pin down how far it went, someone enlighten me) actually goes in the favor of Muslim rights.

A Lela Ahmadzai design, truly gorgeous. A work of art.

Perhaps my favorite of all the sites and articles I have come across is Burka Meets Haute Couture.
Lela Ahmadzai is an Afghani woman who, while having left and attended school outside Afghanistan, is proud of and in touch with her heritage. As part of a diploma project, she designed a series of outfits that reached out and bridged her Afghani self with the western world she was living in. I find her pieces both beautiful and inspirational… truly, this is fine art.

Sources

1) http://deathby1000papercuts.com/2008/07/iran-fashion-show-the-burka-patrol-and-the-crackdown-on-immorality/ -Article

2) http://abcnews.go.com/International/popup?id=4421425 -The Burqa Gets a Makeover

3) http://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/fashion/news/paris-designers-react-to-burka-ban-1919187.html

4) http://www.celebuzz.com/mias-fashion-burka-yay-nay-s263081/ -M.I.A. Wears a Burka to Promote Album

5) http://www.anorak.co.uk/254149/media/syria-bans-the-fashion-forward-burqa-as-britain-embraces-muslim-punk.html

6) http://relijournal.com/islam/the-burqa-facts-issues/ – Very informative and serious article addressing the facts about the burka

7) http://www.burkameetshautecouture.com/hm_englisch.htm – Lela Ahmadzai’s diploma project addressing fashion and her Afghani heritage. Very beautiful and Highly recommended!

Sri Lankan rapper M.I.A. donned this burka at an award show a couple months ago.

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The Original Lord of the Dance (Stand aside Michael Flatley)

Last week I talked about the Batman quilt I am making for my brother, and I mentioned how it all started with that center panel. Well, I have an idea for my next quilt, and the concept is similar. I have another centerpiece that I need to design around. I don’t know where it originated, but I stumbled upon it at the Goodwill in Champaign, IL.

This is the Nataraja. The name comes from the words nadanam, meaning “dance” and raja, meaning “lord” or “king”. The image is of the Hindu god Shiva dancing tandava, which has the power to destroy and re-create the universe.

Now, I am not Hindu, in fact, the only thing I ever learned in High School about Shiva was that he is “The Destroyer” and is part of the trinity in Hinduism (Brahma – The Creator, Vishnu – The Preserver, and Shiva – The Destroyer) and that he pretty much just tore up the universe and was this destructive force. I have, however, done my own research and reading since then.. and I find the legends and the stories fascinating, and just because I may not worship a particular deity, does not mean I shouldn’t treat it with proper respect.
And so it is that while wanting to incorporate this Nataraja panel into a quilt, I feel I should approach the design with that respect in mind. What kinds of symbols are important? Are there any mantras or poojas (prayers) that belong to him that would be appropriate to applique somewhere? Being the script lover I am, I think it would be beautiful to try to work some text into the design.. but I want to make sure it’s appropriate before I just do it. So, I’ve been trying to do some research this afternoon, trying to learn more about Shiva and the tandava dance.

Here are the basic characteristics of the nataraja, according to Source 4:

Though there are minor variations, the characteristic features of Nataraj are as follows: he is shown with four hands, two on either side. The upper left hand holds a flame, the lower left hand points down to the demon Muyalaka, who is shown holding a cobra. The demon is being crushed by Shiva’s right foot; the other foot is raised. The upper right hand holds a drum, the lower one is in the abhaymudra, ‘be without fear’. Shiva’s hair is braided and jewelled, but some of his locks whirl as he dances; within the folds of his hair are a wreathing cobra, a skull, and the figure of Ganga. The entire figure stands on a lotus pedestal and is fringed by a circle of flames, which are touched by the hands holding the drum and the fire.

There is so much symbolism in that image alone, and because I do want the image to be the central focus, I want to be careful not to make the background too busy.  Here are a couple of very simple concept drawings:

With this first concept, I am considering the fact that Shiva brings about both creation and destruction. One corner begins as solid blue and increasingly breaks apart (becomes destroyed) as it moves closer toward the center (where Shiva is). As it progresses onward toward the other corner, pieces of pink begin to form, solidifying more as you arrive at the bottom corner (something new has been created). I chose the colors blue and pink not only because they are present in the panel and will look nice, but also because Shiva in one sense (Ardhanareeswara)  is also both male and female.^3   I have also put columns on either side of the main panel where I might be able to incorporate appropriate text (depending on space, this could be appliqued or embroidered).

This second concept incorporates some other symbols related to Shiva. Specifically, he has a crescent moon on his head from which the Ganga (the Ganges River) is supposed to flow. According to source 3:

Shiva bears on his head the crescent of the panchami (fifth day) moon. This is placed near the fiery third eye and this shows the power of Soma, the sacrificial offering, which is the representative of moon. It means that Shiva possesses the power of procreation along with the power of destruction. The moon is also a measure of time, thus Crescent also represent his control over time.

The other symbol is the snake, which Shiva wears as a necklace (though in the nataraja images the snake is around his waist). This is supposed to signify that:

Shiva is beyond the powers of death and is often the sole support in case of distress. He swallowed the poison kalketu for the wellbeing of the Universe. The deadly cobra represents that “death” aspect that Shiva has thoroughly conquered. The cobras around his neck also represent the dormant energy, called Kundalini, the serpent power. The snake curled three times around the neck of Lord Shiva depicts the past, present and future time. The snake looking in the right direction of Lord Shiva signifies that the Lord’s perpetual laws of reason and justice preserve natural order in the universe.

As yet I am not entirely satisfied with either of my concepts, but it is a starting point. I’m now more interested in doing this quilt than I was previously… I have always been keenly fascinated by duality- good/evil, creation/destruction..    and I find it a fitting link to the fact that a lot of the textile work I do involves creating new projects from old clothes or other fabrics.. destroying several pairs of jeans to cut out small diamond pieces and shaping them into a star, tearing apart an old dress and re-inventing it with some lace.

Sources

1) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bksp8mpTeYY – A basic intro video about Lord Shiva

2) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nataraja – The Wiki article about the Nataraja (Shiva in his dancing form)

3) http://www.mahashivratri.org / – A very informative site with legends and festival info as well.

4) http://www.sscnet.ucla.edu/southasia/Religions/Avatars/Natar.html – The main site itself provides a wide variety of information about India, on everything from religion to social issues to history to the diaspora. Very good, and created by a History Professor at UCLA.

5) http://www.deeshaa.org/tandava-shivas-cosmic-dance/ – A blog post which breaks down Shiva and Nataraja in such a way that it is easily understandable by someone not totally knowledgeable about him (i.e. Me).

 

Reigning in the Muse

It is the curse of the creative mind to constantly be thinking about the next project. Inspiration is always showing itself to me and my mind plays around with all kinds of new scenarios. I might see some new fabric or an old jacket and can just see how these items can be used to give life to new art or some new purpose. And yet, I must be self-disciplined to not simply jump in and start some new project each time the muse strikes me. Otherwise the projects I have already begun will never be finished and my room will become overcrowded with newly started works in progress.
As of this moment, I have 3 projects I am working on.. the Nowhere Man I talked about last week, a double knit scarf and a quilt I started last year that was intended to be my brother’s Christmas present.  Maybe he’ll get it this year… maybe.  Since I am reigning in my muse and not starting anything new until this is completed, here is the progress of my quilt (don’t worry, I’ve already shown it to my brother, he likes it and is anxiously awaiting it’s completion. lol):

Playing around with design schemes..

This is actually my mother’s fault. I had found this Batman panel of fabric and had originally thought to make a simple wall hanging out of it for my brother, because he loves Batman. I asked my mother what she thought and she said, “well, you know, he needs a new blanket..”.  And so, I got to work trying to create an original design that incorporated the panel but made it a central focus rather than taking away from it.

The final design

And I set to work cutting out the pieces, after doing some math and figuring how many inches each of the squares on the graph paper were supposed to equal.

Organizing the cut pieces

This is the quilt entirely pieced together.  I machine pieced it, but am hand quilting it. This is also my first quilt.. and I had no idea just how long and tedious the process is.

To give you some idea, the bed which it is draped over is queen sized.

All that is really left is to applique the little bats in the corners (in the yellow.. the corners are meant to resemble the bat signal that would appear in the sky that called Batman into action). After that, I will finally be able to ship it to my brother and begin the next quilt. 🙂

He’s a Real Nowhere Man

I know it’s been a few weeks since my initial post, and I apologize for that. I’ve been extremely busy most of the month. I’ve sat down and given this blog a healthy dose of will power and fiber, so I promise this thing will be regular from here on out 🙂

Earlier this year I started playing around with old jeans and scraps of denim. I didn’t really have any rhyme or reason, I was just toying around, not really knowing what I would make, what these old pieces of jeans would become… kind of like streams of consciousness crafting, lol.  I wasn’t far into anything when I got called into doing some other major project and my little nowhere man got shoved into a forgotten corner of the fabric heap.

My Little Nowhere Man

Well, I have finally reunited myself with my little nowhere man, and have started working on him once more. Only now, I have all these ideas running through my head.. I’ve decided that my nowhere man needs a purpose.. he should be going somewhere.

I considered what he is.. he is essentially pieces of recycled denim being handsewn together like a patchwork quilt. So I thought more about the concept of combining blue jeans and quilts… and thought to myself, a denim quilt, even a small one, would be kind of heavy and cumbersome.  That was out. I thought about building on him and making him into a couch pillow.. but I felt that my nowhere man needed to be seen out in the world. He needs to be worn. But how?

I thought about what he symbolizes, what he represents.. I looked at the history and cultural significance of blue jeans in America. They say that the average American owns 7 pairs of jeans. I am no exception.. in fact, I own about 10 pair. So I did some research.. here are some of the more interesting parts of blue jean history, for your amusement:

  • Despite the fact that denim has actually been around longer than the USA and was developed in Europe some 500 years ago blue jeans have become a distinctly American wardrobe.
  • The word “jeans” comes from the name Genoa, where sailors wore pants made of a kind of rough cotton/ linen blend material(1).
  • The officially recognized birthdate of the blue jeans we know and love today is May 20, 1873. It was on this day that Levi Strauss got the patent to add rivets for added durability. The idea of Jacob Davis, who sold the idea to Strauss and went into business with him (3).  Blue jeans started off as the sturdy and long lasting pants worn by the miners, the scores of men searching for gold, and most any hard working laborer because they were rugged and didn’t rip and tear as easily. Because of this, jeans are tied into that American dream, that hunt for fortune and glory of the prospectors and into the notion of self-reliance and a hard days work.

It was Hollywood that really helped to push the image of blue jeans. Most of the world thinks of blue jeans and thinks of the cowboy or the American Old West. Indeed, according to Wikipedia:

In Spain they are known as vaqueros (“cowboys”) or tejanos (“Texans“), in Danish cowboybukser
meaning “cowboy pants” and in Chinese niuzaiku (SC: 牛仔裤, TC: 牛仔褲), literally, “cowboy pants”
(trousers), indicating their association with the American West, cowboy culture, and outdoors
work. Similarly, the Hungarian name for jeans is “farmer” (short for “farmernadrág”, meaning
“farmer’s trousers”).

Before Hollywood started making westerns and depicting cowboys wearing jeans, cowboys actually hadn’t worn jeans as a regular thing. Of course, the movies and John Wayne helped to change that.
It was in 1950’s that started to bring about the association of jeans with rebelliousness, non-conformity and youth. Teenagers were wearing jeans more often, and movies like “Rebel Without a Cause” with James Dean and “The Wild One” with Marlon Brando gave rise to the image of the American bad boy, the wild child anti-hero. And what was this iconic anti-hero wearing? Blue jeans (and a leather jacket, but that will be another post for another day).  Did you know blue jeans were actually banned from schools and other public places because they were connected to this troublemaker image?

Marlon Brando in "The Wild One"

Movie poster for "Rebel Without a Cause"

I thought about all these connotations, all these icons and images that are wrapped up into the very soul of the substance I was working with. I thought about the social and environmental implications of my making this.. thing.. strictly out of old blue jeans, and that I am not using my sewing machine at all and doing all the work by hand. My mind took a tangent off into the realm of Etsy and what kind of meaning that has for us, for those of us who have gotten tired of cookie cutter fashion and big corporations controlling what we buy, what we think. I thought of how 50-60 years ago, or more, Americans knew more about how to make their own clothes and alter them themselves. I thought about how few of those of us who sew our own clothes in America today know how to draft their own patterns.. we buy readily available patterns from McCall’s or Simplicity or whoever. All we have to do is trace and ta-da! I thought about that, and how girls in Japan draft their own patterns from ゴスロリ(Gosu Rori) and the like as if it were nothing. I feel like I’m in the middle of some kind of Pro-Green, Anti-Consumer Culture, Anti-Walmart-and-all-it-stands-for, Neo-Self-Reliance Revolution…  and how, somehow, my little nowhere man is supposed to be this unifying visual symbol for all of these concepts and ideas.

And then I remembered my Peirce (Semiotics) and what my nowhere man really began as.. a nowhere man. And I think he would look pretty cool as the back panel of a denim jacket when he grows up.

Sources

  1. http://www.jeans-and-accessories.com/history-of-blue-jeans.html
  2. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jeans
  3. Confidential: Blue Jean Confidential via Youtube. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YK-JRxrprAA

The Official Cast-On

The idea for this blog has been bouncing around in my head for what seems like ages. Because I’ve never really been certain exactly what angle I wanted to come from, and because life has a tendency to happen, I have consequently put-off this blog’s maiden post time and again. (I blame perfectionism)

So, a little about myself..

I am a twenty-something frabriholic who recently graduated from college with a major in Anthropology and a minor in Linguistics. As such, I am fascinated with textiles, cultures and language/communication. This blog will serve as a way of bringing those interests and fascinations together in one spot. I already have several ideas running through my mind, and things I would like to explore and experiment with. Here is a small sampling of what you can look forward to down the road:

  • How do the clothes we wear communicate to others?
  • Exploring cultural diffusion within the world of fashion.
  • Exploring different textile traditions across the globe and through time.
  • DIY and step by step how-to

I do not merely aim to address these topics from an academic standpoint, I am also an avid creator as well. I learned to cross stitch when I was a small child, and taught myself how to knit, crochet, and sew. I recently designed and made some clothes which were featured as part of a runway show (read about it here, under the July 2010 heading) for the benefit of Access 4 in Springfield, IL.  The following are my 2 favorite pieces, which also got the most attention at the show:

Both of these dresses were altered creations. The original dresses came from Goodwill. The first of these dresses started off as the matronly black dress pictured to the left. I took my seam ripper to it, removed the black lace and replaced it with hot pink lace, but without adding the neck or sleeves back to it, so it looks more like a corset style dress. I also shortened the skirt considerably (from floor length to just above the knees). The end result is pictured to the right.

The second dress (which I unfortunately do not have a before picture of) started off as a maroon bridesmaids dress. The original was actually made by ILGWU.  Basically, I removed the sleeves, took the dress completely apart (the seam ripper is my best friend), covered it in black lace, and sewed it back together, gathering the lace at the bottom in a kind of ball gown fashion. This might seem like a simple process, but trust me, I fought this dress like the devil. On more than one occasion I had to rip out my own stitches and redo it because the edges would not be lined up properly and one panel would seem longer than the other, or I’d have this unsightly fabric bubble (observe below).

So what did I do? I screamed, cussed out both the dress and my sewing machine, cried a little bit and then proceeded to re-sew the seam by hand.  This dress (and lack of sleep because I was trying to meet a deadline) almost drove me insane. Pictured below is my hand stitching, with a ruler to show my distance between stitches. Anyone who sews by hand can appreciate this.

And, finally, this is myself modeling the finished dress (with a hoop skirt underneath to give it volume).