The Tale of Warby Parker

This blog post will be showcasing cool new eyewear from Warby Parker.
This post is a bit different in that I was specifically asked if I would write something.
I do my homework on anything I plug and value transparency, so I’m being upfront that this post is a bit different. I’m not being paid or given anything for this beyond a promise to share my blog. So, exposure.

What is Warby Parker?

In simple terms, they are a cheaper, socially conscious alternative to the traditional route of buying glasses. They offer designer eyewear in a range of styles starting around $95. I’ve only ever purchased one pair of glasses in my life, and it cost me upwards of $200 with vision insurance. So, that sounds like a pretty good deal to me, based on my one prescription eyewear purchase. How are they able to cut the cost? According to their website:

“Most high-end brands do not produce their own eyewear. Instead, they sell those rights to massive companies who design, manufacture, and sell branded glasses directly to optical shops. Those optical shops tack on additional mark-ups to frames and lenses before selling them to you. We cut out the middleman by designing and producing our own eyewear, then passing on the savings to customers. We effectively sell glasses wholesale (because it makes no sense for customers to pay for multiple mark-ups).”

The trade off of this that I want to point out, so that you can make informed choices in your purchases, is that the “middle man” is other peoples’ jobs. If you’re seeing an eye doctor from a local business in your community, not buying your glasses from said local business might be cutting into their ability to stay open. If you’re seeing an eye doctor that isn’t connected to their own shop or is located in a big box store, just get your script and buy from these guys.

That said, you’re already reading this online, so chances are you already do oddles of shopping online, sending money outside your local community. I do too. I’m not placing any value judgement or saying one option is better than the other, I just try to lay everything on the table. There are also other options for buying glasses online (which also hurt the local shop), that aren’t as committed to sustainability or fair labor practice or working to connect developing communities around the world with better vision.

They also have a freaking monocle! That’s admittedly kind of awesome…

The Goods

Warby Parker introduced 10 new frame styles for their Winter 2016 collection. I’m going to showcase some of my favorites, but you can see the rest of this collection and all they have to offer HERE

  • Daisy
    These are my favorite. If I ever need to replace my current glasses or decide to get new ones just for a change in style, I’d go with these. They’re like a sleeker, sexier version of the classic nerd look. I like it.
  • Morris
    I don’t really have much of anything of substance to say about these. Another take on the classic nerd look. Mostly I just think this model is hot. And I honestly think the glasses are adding to that appeal – I’m trying to picture him without the glasses and it doesn’t seem the same. So, if you’re a dude with this face shape and want to increase the likelihood that I or someone with my taste would think you’re attractive, maybe go with these ones.

Hey girl, I think we should study together.

  • Goodney
    Cat Eyes! Meow! Updated take on an old school style. Can’t go wrong.
  • Welty
    Alright, clearly I have a thing for the classic nerd look. Here’s something a bit more fun.

Purse Repair and Updates

After a wonderful 2 weeks in North Carolina, I had to return home and return to work. I had hoped to have some pictures of Neil’s baby nephew wearing the shirt I made for him, but sadly, when Neil and I left to drive out to visit his brother, we both forgot to bring the box of baby clothes. We did, however, leave them in NC with his Dad to give to the baby later next month. So, pictures are still to come, they just have a longer wait than I originally anticipated.

While I was on vacation, I took advantage of the time to read Overdressed: The Shockingly High Cost of Cheap Fashion by Elizabeth L. Cline. If you’ve been following my Facebook page (click on the “like” button in the Facebook widget to the

overdressed_bookright of the blog), you’ve already seen my praises for this book and that I feel everyone needs to read it. What happens in the textile industry and how clothes are consumed does not stay in the textile industry. It has direct ties to the economy, unemployment and the struggle for a living wage/ fair labor practices, the environment, and how arable land is used just to name a few.
If you’re like me, you can’t really afford to buy “new” clothes anyhow, even the fast fashion from the mall or Target. I buy almost all of my clothes second hand, or I make my own. But when you DO buy new clothes, you should understand the power your dollars really do have. No matter where you get your clothes, it could be worth the time to learn how to alter and/or repair them yourself to make them last and fit better, or find a local seamstress or tailor to do the work for you (and help support your local economy while you’re at it).

It is in the spirit of repairing and keeping what I already have and getting it’s full use that I am fixing one of my purses. This backpack purse was actually my very first purse. My father got it for me when I was in 6th grade. I never really used it until I started riding my bike more than driving my car – the little black backpack purse was both cute and effective for carrying while on a bike. However, the lining inside my little purse ripped and I’d been having issues with my keys and other things falling through into the no man’s land between lining and purse. Not really having any lining on hand and knowing cotton is sturdier anyway, I chose to re-purpose an old pillow sham.

The old lining, after taking a seam ripper to my purse. I used the original lining as a pattern for the new.

New lining.

The inside of my gutted purse.

I still have to do the actual sewing yet, but wanted to share the start with you all the same. Stay tuned to see how it turns out!